LTJ
criterioncorner:

L’AVVENTURA (dir. Michelangelo Antonioni) 1960
Poster designed by Jan Lenica (1928 - 2001)
the latest installment of Adrian Curry’s great “movie of the week” column over at Mubi.com focuses on those fancy Quay brothers, and — in exploring their influences — lists several of their favorite Polish movie posters. framed prints of the posters occupy an entire corner of the Quay brothers’ new exhibition at MoMA, which opens on Sunday and runs through January 7, 2013. 
here’s Curry on Lenica: 
“Another huge influence on the Quays, if not the biggest of all, was Jan Lenica (1928-2001). Lenica was a renowned poster designer who, in 1957, in collaboration with fellow graphiste Walerian Borowczyk (sadly not represented in the show), turned to animation. According to Michael Brooke in the booklet for Zeitgeist Films’ DVD collection of the Quays’ short films (which, full disclosure, I was the design director of, Zeitgeist having been the American distributor of the Quays for the past twenty years), Lenica’s “cut-out animation was a major influence on the Quays’ early art-school projects.” A fellow emigré, like the Quays, he lived from 1963 to 1986 in France and from 1987 onwards in Berlin. (None of Lenica’s film work is available on DVD in the States, shamefully, but a number can be seen on YouTube, including a top quality transfer of his 1963 totalitarian satire Labyrinth.)”

criterioncorner:

L’AVVENTURA (dir. Michelangelo Antonioni) 1960

Poster designed by Jan Lenica (1928 - 2001)

the latest installment of Adrian Curry’s great “movie of the week” column over at Mubi.com focuses on those fancy Quay brothers, and — in exploring their influences — lists several of their favorite Polish movie posters. framed prints of the posters occupy an entire corner of the Quay brothers’ new exhibition at MoMA, which opens on Sunday and runs through January 7, 2013. 

here’s Curry on Lenica: 

“Another huge influence on the Quays, if not the biggest of all, was Jan Lenica (1928-2001). Lenica was a renowned poster designer who, in 1957, in collaboration with fellow graphiste Walerian Borowczyk (sadly not represented in the show), turned to animation. According to Michael Brooke in the booklet for Zeitgeist Films’ DVD collection of the Quays’ short films (which, full disclosure, I was the design director of, Zeitgeist having been the American distributor of the Quays for the past twenty years), Lenica’s “cut-out animation was a major influence on the Quays’ early art-school projects.” A fellow emigré, like the Quays, he lived from 1963 to 1986 in France and from 1987 onwards in Berlin. (None of Lenica’s film work is available on DVD in the States, shamefully, but a number can be seen on YouTube, including a top quality transfer of his 1963 totalitarian satire Labyrinth.)”